Job-Seeking Lawyers/Law Students: Follow #NALP12

The National Association for Law Placement (NALP) is hosting its Annual Education Conference this week in Austin, Texas.  There is a Twitter hashtag, #NALP12, that anyone may follow to receive updates from or about the conference.  I highly recommend that job-seeking lawyers and law students follow this hashtag for the following reasons:

  1. Meet the players. Many law firm recruiting/hiring contacts will appear in the #NALP12 Twitter stream as they tweet from the conference.  By following #NALP12, you can identify these contacts and follow up with questions or comments.  Don’t ask them for a job immediately; but, get to know them and what their firms have to offer.  Begin to build relationships with them.
  2. Raise your profile. If you tweet thoughtful questions in response to the #NALP12 tweets, attendees at the conference will notice you.  Perhaps the panelists/speakers will even monitor the tweets for their sessions and respond to your questions during the sessions.
  3. Receive job search tips and market intelligence. The substantive content of the sessions is incredible for job-seekers.   You have the opportunity to receive job search tips and market intelligence directly from the employers making hiring decisions.  Keep your eyes open for tweets from the following sessions:
  • “Rocket Docketeers” – Judicial Clerkships for the IP Student
  • Alternative Careers:  The Upside Down Pyramid
  • Assessment Tools and Innovative Interview Techniques:  What Are They and How Are They Used?
  • Beyond the Beltway:  Opportunities in Federal, State and Local Government
  • Landing a Job with the United Nations
  • Launching an Immigration Law Career at the Courthouse
  • Navigating U.S. Bar Exam Requirements for Foreign Trained Lawyers
  • NALP Update on the Legal Employment Market
  • Understanding the Current Legal Economy
  • Skills-Based Hiring for Effective Post-Recession Lateral Associate Recruitment
  • Careers in the Military

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One comment

  1. never thought about it.

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